Justification for Using 13g 4c Cable in Place of 10g 2c Cable



There are two important factors to consider for this article:

High-powered loudspeakers and their associated amplification (usually over 1,000 watts) produce high current demands and often 10-gauge wire is preferred to reduce voltage drop.

The current-carrying capability of a conductor is determined by its cross-sectional area.



Cross-sectional area is determined in a round conductor with the formula:



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A(Square Inches) = πr
2 where π is the constant 3.14159.
10-gage wire has a conductor diameter of 0.1019 inches.
13-gage wire has a conductor diameter of 0.0720 inches.

Using the radius formula, where “r” is the radius and “d” is the diameter:

r = d/2, r = d/2

The radius of a 10-gage wire is: r = d/2 = 0.1019/2 = 0.0510, and
The radius of a 13-gage wire is: r = d/2 = 0.0720/2 = 0.360.




Now that the radius is known, the cross-sectional area can be calculated with the
following formula:



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A = πr^2

Thus,
The area of a 10-gage wire is: A = πr^2
= π(0.0510)^2
= π(0.0026) = 0.0082.
The area of a 13-gage wire is: A = πr^2
= π(0.0360)^2
= π(0.0013) = 0.0041




Adding two 13-gage wires together produces a cross-sectional area of
0.0041 + 0.0041 = 0.0082, the exact cross-sectional area of a 10-gage wire.
Thus, by pairing two sets of two 13-gage conductors together, Clark SPKR1304 cable can be used as a direct substitute for SPKR1002 or any other 10-2 cable.



Todd A. Boettcher, CPBE
Sales Engineer

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